How To Make A Delta Kite

Step-by-Step - Page 1 of 4 

The MBK Dowel Delta

This set of instructions on how to make a Delta kite assumes you know absolutely nothing about kite making. You might already have some of the simple tools and materials required. Anything you don't have is easily bought. If not exactly what I used, then at least something pretty similar!

These instructions might look quite detailed. However, your reward is an impressive but quite cheap kite that looks almost bird-like in the air.

Watch real birds fly in for a closer look, at times!

This Delta is a tail-less design that is 0.8DL (96cm, 38 1/2") tall and has a wingspan of 2.0DL (240cm, 96"). Like traditional Deltas, this kite has a floating spreader which keeps the leading edge spars apart.

This design is a very light to gentle wind flier.

The MBK Dowel Delta is designed to fold down a slim cylindrical package like a Sled, thanks to the removable spreader. Setting up on the flying field takes just a couple of minutes.

Of course, if you have enough room in your car, you can always leave this kite ready-to-fly.

Making The MBK Dowel Delta Kite is a handy e-book of printable step-by-step instructions. It's a PDF file download.

Here's how to make a Delta kite - the MBK Dowel Delta.MBK Dowel Delta




I have chosen to make '1 Dowel Length' equal to 120cm for every kite in the Dowel series. If you are in North America, 48" of 3/16" dowel is close enough to 120cm of 5mm dowel. This will result in a kite with similar flying characteristics to my original.




How To Make A Delta Kite
Cutting The Sail

Now's the time to read up on the kite making tools and materials required for making a Dowel Delta, if you haven't already.

The sail and keel templates for the Dowel Delta.

The template shown above represents one side of the kite sail. You will now transfer these measurements to the sail plastic as follows...

Note: Although it's based on 120cm meter dowels, the Delta design means the total wingspan is a lot more than that. Hence, two garden bags are required, one for the left side of the sail and one for the right.

Hint: To mark long lines with a short ruler, try the following...

  1. Run a piece of flying line along the entire length, and keep in place with a weighty object at each end.
  2. Pull a little line through, to ensure it is under tension hence perfectly straight.
  3. Mark dots under the line, at intervals slightly shorter than your ruler.
  4. Remove the line and weights.
  5. With ruler and pen, join the dots!
The Dowel Delta - half the sail marked out on plastic.
  • Firstly, take one large bag that you want to use for the sail, cut it down one side and along the bottom and lay it flat on the floor.
  • Mark dots on the plastic which correspond to the top, bottom and 'wing tip' corners of the Template. Leave a margin of several cm (or inches) between the center-line and the edge of the plastic.
  • Using the marking pen, rule those 3 long lines.
  • Starting from the 'wing tip', measure along the leading edge line, and draw in the tabs. The short lines can be done by eye, but just make sure the tabs are at least 5 dowel widths (diameters) wide.
  • The left side of the plastic might be a bit ragged. So, draw another black line next to the center line, all the way from top to bottom, about 2 cm (an inch or so) away from the center-line. Now draw short horizontal lines connecting to the top and bottom of the template, as in the photo.



The Dowel Delta - 2 wing halves brought together
  • Only half the sail has been outlined. Take another bag, cutting it and laying it flat over the top of the first bag. No measuring to do now, just trace over all the black lines, making sure nothing shifts as you do each line.
  • Using scissors, and doing one line at a time, cut along the long lines near the center-lines. All the way from top to bottom of the plastic sheets.
  • Flip the second plastic bag over and align the center-lines of both Template shapes. Tape down both joins with clear sticky tape, all the way from top to bottom. One join will be facing you, the other facing the floor. The center section is darker since it is where both sheets of plastic overlap.



When doing the following, most of the width of the tape should be inside the kite's outline. Use just 1 or 2 lengths of tape for each line. Hold it out straight, touch it down to the plastic at one end, then at the other end, dab it down in the middle, then press down all along its length.

The Dowel Delta - where to put the edge tape
  • Lay clear sticking tape along some of the edges, where indicated by the yellow rectangles. In a nut-shell, tape every edge except the long edges of the tabs.
  • With scissors, cut along all the black outline. This will leave most of the width of the sticking tape inside the sail outline. See the photo.
  • Finally, wrap clear sticky tape around the double-thickness edges at the nose and tail ends of the sail.

Try the Making The MBK Dowel Delta Kite PDF, if you prefer to work offline or from printouts. A little more convenient than working from live Web pages, you might find :-)


Continue to page 2





Need winders, reels, flying line?

We earn a small commission if you click the following link and buy something. The item does not cost you any more, since we are an "affiliate" of Amazon.

Click here to buy anything you need. Just use the Search box in there if you need different weights or lengths of line, for example.

P.S. Keep an eye out for books by kite author Glenn Davison, a prominent kite person in the USA.




What's New!

  1. Making Paper Kites - A Step-By-Step Guide

    Sep 18, 18 12:58 AM

    Making Paper Kites is a fully photo-illustrated step-by-step guide to making high-flying Sled, Diamond, Rokkaku, Sode and Delta kites from just copier paper and sticky tape. Even the spars are paper-a…

    Read More





Comments

Plenty of fun kite info, photos and videos - there's definitely too much here for only one visit! Feel free to leave your impressions of this site or just this page, below...



Return to How To Make A Kite from How To Make A Delta Kite

All the way back to Home Page


 

E-Book
Testimonials

(unedited)

"Love the easy to understand step by step instructions, made from next to nothing materials and above all so much fun to fly... cheers Tim for sharing your well thought out pdf kite designs with the whole world.

Very satisfying making your own and watching them get air-born for the first time."

_________________

"I decided to run kite making as an elective again on this camp in the past week - so I bought all your e-books, a bunch of materials, and then took a group of 10 high school students through making the kites over 4 days. We built a diamond, a Barn Door, a Delta, and two skew delta kites. Again - every single kite flew."

_________________

"I've just bought your super e-book and spent most of last night pouring through all the great stuff in it!

Very detailed and USEFUL information - thanks for such a great book."

_________________

"30+ years ago, I tried making a kite using the 'instructions' in a free kite-safety booklet. What a disappointment for a young boy.

 Your instructions and methods are wonderful. You help the builder to focus on accuracy, without making it hard. Also, you use materials that are durable, yet cheap!"

_________________

"omg i made a kite from this site and i fly it ....... booom i didnt expect this bc in the other sites instuction are trash

thank you"

Kite-making e-book: Simplest Dowel Kites

This one's FREE
Download it now!





Wind Speeds


Light air
1-5 km/h
1-3 mph
1-3 knots
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 km/h
4–7 mph
4–6 knots
Beaufort 2    

Gentle breeze
12–19 km/h
8–12 mph
7–10 knots
Beaufort 3    

Moderate breeze
20–28 km/h
13–18 mph
11–16 knots
Beaufort 4    

Fresh breeze
29–38 km/h
19–24 mph
17–21 knots
Beaufort 5    

Strong breeze
39–49 km/h
25–31 mph
22–27 knots
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 km/h
32-38 mph
28-33 knots
Beaufort 7