Delta Lost Over The Pacific Ocean

by Joe
(Eugene, OR, USA)

I built a large delta kite and took it to the Oregon coast one day. The coast is very breezy yet it flew very well in even the lightest wind conditions. I used a bright orange color like hunters wear so it was easy to see.

It took off easily and soon had it flying high. Suddenly I came to the end of the roll of string and the end slipped through my hands. The kite kept soaring up and up and up. I could see it getting higher and higher and finally it was out of sight.

About this time a tourist plane was flying up the coast and began flying in circles where my kite would be. He was several thousand feet up and did several circles so I know he saw it and was curious enough to take a look.

I'm wondering how high it flew and how far. I suppose it flew all day until night fell and the cooling temperatures brought it down many miles away. Or maybe it just kept going, riding the sea breeze, until it was pushed down into the sea by a storm. Or maybe it made in to Hawaii and some kid found it but I doubt it. It's most likely shredded and now a part of the island of plastic junk somewhere in the Pacific.

Next time I will secure my line so I won't lose it. And perhaps I'll attach a SASE and note and maybe I'll get a response from Japan.

Thanks for letting me share my story.

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I know the feeling
by: Anonymous

Hi. I had commented some time ago, about how I had tied a knot in my kite line, and the disappointment when I saw my kite sail away.

Except in my instance, the end of the kite line that was attached to the kite snagged on the top of a tree and was proudly flying above the tree line for a while. I never got it back, and my kite is shredded as well, but the remains were probably used for a birds nest.

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Top story!
by: Tim P.

Well, that's unusual. It's possible the kite was riding a cold front - a massive wedge of cold air that pushes a warmer air mass up as it progresses. Glider pilots have been known to make some amazing flights in such conditions.

Thanks again for a great contribution to this site!

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