Making Up A Kite Line

Pardon the mess, here and/or in other parts of this site!

All will be looking better by mid-November. T.P. (major site update in progress)

Plus A Simple Wooden Winder

Of course, there are many ways to make up a kite line and winder. Most people just buy a winder or kite reel with line already on it, from a kite shop.

I must admit we use 20 pound Twisted Dacron line from a shop, for all our Skewer kites, since this is good stuff for flying small to medium sized designs. However, in the spirit of doing things cheaply, we use handmade wooden winders.

In Australia, kites may not be flown higher than 100 meters (330 feet) above ground level, according to Air Traffic regulations.

Accessories like this Stake Line Winder on Amazon are a convenient way to go if you prefer not to make your own.




The winder described here has been made up to take around 50 meters (150 feet) of line. This is a good length to test out a new kite of any size. If you really like the results, and have a spacious area in which to fly, you can make a bigger winder and use much more line.

Kite line - shaped block

This winder is suitable for all the Skewer kites. The ends were shaped with a medium-grade woodworking file. The finer-grade files can take a long time to remove enough wood, if it is fairly hard.

The block is about as long as a ball-point pen. You don't really want to go any smaller than this, otherwise you'll be spending a lot of time winding and unwinding line.

Of course, if you take pride in your woodwork, you'll want to sand it back all over and give it a few coats of varnish! I actually came across a guy who does exactly this, and sells his winders on the Net.

Kite line - attached to block

After measuring out 50 meters of whatever type of line you have decided to use, put a simple overhand loop into one end. Hang the loop over one 'horn' of the winder, as shown in the photo. Then, wind on all the line.

Of course, this means that when letting out line, you have to be careful when there are just a few winds left on the winder! However, doing it this way leaves you free to do other things with the line.

For example, attach it to a kite arch anchor line, or an attachment point on another kite line as part of a kite stack.

Kite Line - a simple wooden winder.

After all the line is wound on, tie a simple overhand loop into the free end. This is now ready to attach to any MBK kite bridle using a Lark's Head knot.


That's it for making up a simple winder and a length of kite line.


Need winders, reels, flying line?

We earn a small commission if you click the following link and buy something. The item does not cost you any more, since we are an "affiliate" of Amazon.

Click here to buy anything you need. Just use the Search box in there if you need different weights or lengths of line, for example.

P.S. Keep an eye out for books by kite author Glenn Davison, a prominent kite person in the USA.

What's New!

  1. Flight Report:
    Club Fly At Semaphore

    Nov 11, 18 10:45 PM

    It was back to the usual Semaphore Park location this month... True to the weather site prediction, a Gentle-strength breeze was coming off the ocean after mid-day. The direction was much more souther…

    Read More

Wind Speeds

Light Air
1-5 km/h
1-3 mph
1-3 knots
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 km/h
4–7 mph
4–6 knots
Beaufort 2

Gentle ...
12–19 km/h
8–12 mph
7–10 knots
Beaufort 3

Moderate ...
20–28 km/h
13–18 mph
11–16 knots
Beaufort 4

Fresh ...
29–38 km/h
19–24 mph
17–21 knots
Beaufort 5

Strong ...
39–49 km/h
25–31 mph
22–27 knots
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 km/h
32-38 mph
28-33 knots
Beaufort 7

Like/share this site...

Like/share this page...

Comments

Plenty of fun kite info, photos and videos - there's definitely too much here for only one visit! Feel free to leave your impressions of this site or just this page, below...

Return to How To Make A Kite from Kite Line

All the way back to Home Page