How To Make A Box Kite

Step-by-Step - Page 2 of 3

The MBK 1-Skewer Box 





How To Make A Box Kite
Cross-Pieces 

The 1-Skewer Box kite - fitting the cross-pieces
  • Fit the shorter cross-piece as in the top photo, between the unmarked spars. Wrap a small square piece of electrical insulation tape around where each tip touches the spar.
  • Trim the longer cross-piece a little at a time until you can slide it completely into position between the marked spars. It's ok if the marked spars are pushed apart just a little. Put a drop or 2 of wood glue at each end to secure it, as in the bottom photo. At this point, the 2 cross-pieces should be holding the kite open, with all the plastic panels under a little bit of tension.
  • When the glue is dry, flip the kite over and add some more glue to strengthen those joins on the other side.




How To Make A Box Kite
Final Bits

Try this Kite Winder from Amazon, if you are not sure where to get suitable flying line. The 20 pound strength is ample for all the Skewer Series kites.
The 1-Skewer Box kite completed.  - final bits
  • Poke 2 holes in the plastic of a cell, 0.2SL (5.8cm, 2 1/4") from the tip of an unmarked spar. One hole on each side of the spar.
  • Cut off a length of 20 pound flying line, about the length of one skewer, and tie a small Loop Knot into both ends.
  • Attach one end of this bridle to the kite, by passing it through one hole and out the other, and then through a loop. Reinforce the sail near the towing point, with a short strip of sticky tape.
  • Cut off 4 squares of electrical insulation tape and cap the spar tips nearest the bridle.
  • Now tie a loop of flying line around the 2 marked spars, which you can also see in the photo, labeled 'tensioner'. Try to pull just enough tension into it to keep the lines straight, and tie off with a few Half-Hitches.
  • Put a small drop of glue on the tensioner knot.
  • Also put some glue where the cross-pieces touch each other, to keep everything stiffer.




How To Make A Box Kite
Attaching The Tail

Attaching the tail.
  • Cut off several loops of plastic from a dark garbage bag, and knot them together to a length of at least 3SL (90cm, 35"). The width should be about the same as 2 adult fingers, or a little more.
  • With sticky tape, attach one end of the tail to the lower tip of the spar to which the bridle is attached. This should be clear from the flying photo at the bottom of this page.

At this point, you've pretty much finished making the MBK 1-Skewer Box Kite!


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E-book special of the month (25% off)...


The
Sode is a traditional Japanese design, and this MBK version is exciting to watch in rough air!

If you have made Diamonds before, this kite takes a little more time to make. It's still a straight-forward build though, using the same techniques as used for my Dowel Diamond. 

Get the e-book for making the MBK Dowel Sode kite. The cambered sail makes this a very efficient design. Of the Dowel kites, this design is one of my personal favorites!

This Sode flies steep and steady over the Light wind range, and starts to move around quite a bit when the wind picks up to Moderate levels. Tail(s) are entirely optional, but may be added for looks.

The e-book is a PDF file - which means printable instructions to refer to while you make the kite. It also means convenient off-line access if that suits you better.



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Wind Speeds


Light air
1-5 km/h
1-3 mph
1-3 knots
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 km/h
4–7 mph
4–6 knots
Beaufort 2    

Gentle breeze
12–19 km/h
8–12 mph
7–10 knots
Beaufort 3    

Moderate breeze
20–28 km/h
13–18 mph
11–16 knots
Beaufort 4    

Fresh breeze
29–38 km/h
19–24 mph
17–21 knots
Beaufort 5    

Strong breeze
39–49 km/h
25–31 mph
22–27 knots
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 km/h
32-38 mph
28-33 knots
Beaufort 7