The EO6 Box Kite, And Other Questions

by Michael R
(Roscoe, IL, USA)

Q:

Hey Tim! I'd like to say thanks for this awesome resource of a site! I had a great time making the dowel styled Delta kite, I've had a lot of fun with it, not sure it's perfect, but it definitely flies :)

Now for a few questions. I have an e06 box kite by Prism, it's a really cool kite and I'd love to use it more, but it needs quite a bit of wind. Also, it's really unstable in the air, it likes to tip over and once it's upside down it just dives. Any ideas on how to fix this? Would adding a tail be a good solution?

Also I don't live by any lakes or large bodies of water, so I'm kind of having a hard time finding a good RELIABLE place to fly, any tips? There are some big fields around but they are surrounded by trees and I have problems with turbulence and unstable, gusty wind.

And lastly, I made a stunt kite as best as I could by looking off of pictures. It has 48in leading edges so that might give an idea on the size. I think it turned out really well and a guy at my local hobby shop said it should fly. I've played with it a bit and it seems to have gone well, but is there any rule of thumb for how the bridle loops should be set up or with how tall the scoops should be in the wings? I don't own a real stunt kite and I've never flown one before so I just have no idea. I can post a pic if that would help :)

A:

Firstly, I just edited your SMS-style submission to a state which won't surprise older (35+) visitors :-) Just about all age groups come through here. Anyway, good questions and here are my thoughts...

"I have an e06 box kite by Prism, ... it's really unstable in the air, it likes to tip over and once it's upside down it just dives. Any ideas on how to fix this? Would adding a tail be a good solution?"

This kite actually has a pretty good reputation. However, it is deliberately designed to be a 'dynamic' flier. (Incidently, I saw the inventor of this kite, Phil McConnachie, at this year's kite festival here in Adelaide) The idea is that you fly it like any other single liner in moderate or above winds. However, in lighter winds, you have the option of working the line a bit and watching the kite tumble and change direction! So, there's probably nothing to 'fix' as such. Just practice and experiment. And take it out in varying wind strengths, to see how it flies in fresher winds.

I'm pretty sure that the 'tumbling cellular' which features in one of the videos in this festival page is either an eo6 or one of the others in the same series. Scroll about 2/3 of the way down the page to find it.

Phil - if anyone points you to this post, feel free to comment! That would be so cool.

"Also I don't live by any lakes or large bodies of water, so I'm kind of having a hard time finding a good RELIABLE place to fly, any tips? There are some big fields around but they are surrounded by trees and I have problems with turbulence and unstable, gusty wind."

You are on the right track with selecting big fields. The bigger the better. Just get in the habit of doing as much flying as possible at about twice tree-height or even higher! That gets the kite out of most of the obstacle-generated turbulence. However, any in-land site will be gusty to some extent.

If you live not far from hills (like I do) or mountains, the gustiness can get ridiculous sometimes! Peak gusts can be 4 times or more than the average wind speed. But any good stable single-liner should, within its wind speed range, be able to cope with this while flying high above the trees. Errrm - don't actually fly over trees if you can help it, or your kite might end up like my Dowel BarnDoor did a few weeks ago :-( Just fly higher than tree-height, and upwind of them.

"I don't own a real stunt kite and I've never flown one before so I just have no idea."

I own a $10 'cheapie' and never fly it these days - so I guess I don't really own a 'real' one either ;-) What you need to do is go to kitebuilder.com, click on the 'forums' link near the top of the page, then scroll down and find the 'Multi Line Kite Design & Construction' sub-forum. These guys would surely be able to help you with any sport-kite design or flying query. You will have to register online in order to post in the forums though.

MBK is more of a single-liner site, as you might have noticed :-) BTW, thanks for referring to it as an 'awesome resource' - appreciate it!

I hope this all helps.

Comments for The EO6 Box Kite, And Other Questions

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Jun 30, 2012
EO6
by: Phil

Tim pretty much hit the nail on the head as to it being a dynamic flier and by playing with the line can create tumbles with a sharp tug, and most importantly a slack line to let the tumble continue.

If the kite is not heading the way you want - more slack is the key as the kites' default is right way up.

The kite is susceptible to instability in gusts due to its design, and if you want extreme stability I join an atom as a tail section and they will take the most gusty conditions with ease.

rgds
Phil

Jun 29, 2012
Thanks A Bunch
by: Michael R

Hey Tim, thanks for the quick reply! The explanation on the eo6 makes a lot of sense now that I know it was designed that way, also thanks for the tip to the other website. I'll keep you updated with how it goes. If you want, I could put together a build log of a super easy two-liner for your website :)

(If you want to be a 'guest author' for a page in the somewhat thin multi-liner section of my site - that would be great! - T.P.)

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