Making Up A Kite Line

Plus A Simple Wooden Winder

Of course, there are many ways to make up a kite line and winder. Most people just buy a winder or kite reel with line already on it, from a kite shop.

I must admit we use 20 pound Twisted Dacron line from a shop, for all our Skewer kites, since this is good stuff for flying small to medium sized designs. However, in the spirit of doing things cheaply, we use handmade wooden winders.

In Australia, kites may not be flown higher than 100 meters (330 feet) above ground level, according to Air Traffic regulations.

Accessories like this Stake Line Winder on Amazon are a convenient way to go if you prefer not to make your own.




The winder described here has been made up to take around 50 meters (150 feet) of line. This is a good length to test out a new kite of any size. If you really like the results, and have a spacious area in which to fly, you can make a bigger winder and use much more line.

Kite line - shaped block

This winder is suitable for all the Skewer kites. The ends were shaped with a medium-grade woodworking file. The finer-grade files can take a long time to remove enough wood, if it is fairly hard.

The block is about as long as a ball-point pen. You don't really want to go any smaller than this, otherwise you'll be spending a lot of time winding and unwinding line.

Of course, if you take pride in your woodwork, you'll want to sand it back all over and give it a few coats of varnish! I actually came across a guy who does exactly this, and sells his winders on the Net.

Kite line - attached to block

After measuring out 50 meters of whatever type of line you have decided to use, put a simple overhand loop into one end. Hang the loop over one 'horn' of the winder, as shown in the photo. Then, wind on all the line.

Of course, this means that when letting out line, you have to be careful when there are just a few winds left on the winder! However, doing it this way leaves you free to do other things with the line.

For example, attach it to a kite arch anchor line, or an attachment point on another kite line as part of a kite stack.

Kite Line - a simple wooden winder.

After all the line is wound on, tie a simple overhand loop into the free end. This is now ready to attach to any MBK kite bridle using a Lark's Head knot.


That's it for making up a simple winder and a length of kite line.




E-book special of the month (25% off)...


The
Sode is a traditional Japanese design, and this MBK version is exciting to watch in rough air!

If you have made Diamonds before, this kite takes a little more time to make. It's still a straight-forward build though, using the same techniques as used for my Dowel Diamond. 

Get the e-book for making the MBK Dowel Sode kite. The cambered sail makes this a very efficient design. Of the Dowel kites, this design is one of my personal favorites!

This Sode flies steep and steady over the Light wind range, and starts to move around quite a bit when the wind picks up to Moderate levels. Tail(s) are entirely optional, but may be added for looks.

The e-book is a PDF file - which means printable instructions to refer to while you make the kite. It also means convenient off-line access if that suits you better.



What's New!

  1. YOUR Kite Aerial Photography

    Dec 07, 16 09:00 AM

    This page features some KAP work by site visitors. From the 'just having a go' to the rather more professional!

    Read More





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Testimonials
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"Love the easy to understand step by step instructions, made from next to nothing materials and above all so much fun to fly... cheers Tim for sharing your well thought out pdf kite designs with the whole world.

Very satisfying making your own and watching them get air-born for the first time."

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Wind Speeds


Light air
1-5 km/h
1-3 mph
1-3 knots
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 km/h
4–7 mph
4–6 knots
Beaufort 2    

Gentle breeze
12–19 km/h
8–12 mph
7–10 knots
Beaufort 3    

Moderate breeze
20–28 km/h
13–18 mph
11–16 knots
Beaufort 4    

Fresh breeze
29–38 km/h
19–24 mph
17–21 knots
Beaufort 5    

Strong breeze
39–49 km/h
25–31 mph
22–27 knots
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 km/h
32-38 mph
28-33 knots
Beaufort 7