How To Build A Box Kite

Step-by-Step - Page 2 of 3

The MBK 2-Skewer Box 





How To Build A Box Kite
Add Cross-Pieces 

The 2-Skewer Box kite - adding the cross-pieces to brace the kite.

Firstly, take a good look at the top photo. The cross pieces both go under one middle spar and over the other one. Hence the kite can be opened out into a box shape.

Another 2 cross pieces need to be fitted now, to make the kite rigid. However, due to the inexact nature of working with bamboo skewers and plastic, you need to fit each one individually. Here's how...

  • Take a bamboo skewer, and snip it to a length just a little longer than one of the cross-pieces already in place.
  • By trial and error, trim the bamboo down until you can just squeeze it into place next to an existing cross-piece, but diagonal to it.
  • Mark the cross-piece and the 2 main spars it touches so you can put it back in the same spot later. Remove the cross-piece and glue small pieces of bamboo to it, just like the 2 already done.While the glue is drying...
  • Just one more cross-piece to do. Fit the last cross-piece in place in the same way, at the other end of the kite. Make more marks so you know where this one goes too. When its length is just right, glue the small pieces on and wait for the glue to dry.

The bottom photo is a close-up, with my markings visible on a main spar and one of the cross-pieces. The other cross-piece had single marks instead of double, to tell them apart. Hope you get the idea!





How To Build A Box Kite
Bridle

The 2-Skewer Box kite - bridle detail
  • Measure 0.3SL (8.7cm, 3 1/2") in from one end of a spar (half the width of the sail), and use a spare skewer to poke a small hole through the plastic, on either side of the spar.
  • Cut off a 3.0SL (87cm, 34 1/2") length of 20 pound flying line, and tie a small Loop Knot into one end.
  • Attach the looped end to the kite, by passing it in one hole and out the other. Feed the other end of the line through the loop and pull tight around the bamboo. See the photo.
  • Add a small length of clear sticky tape onto the sail plastic, to prevent the bridle shifting forward and stretching the plastic. The yellow rectangle on the photo shows where the tape is.
  • Attach the other end of the line to the same spar, just behind the join of the 2 skewers, using a couple of Half Hitches. Smear a drop of wood glue all around the bamboo and into the knot, to hold it secure.

Now take a length of flying line about 1.0SL (29cm, 11 1/2") long, and tie one end to the bridle line with a Prusik Knot, or any other shiftable knot. Tie a small Double Loop Knot into the other end.

All this is visible in the above photo. At this point, you've pretty much finished making the MBK 2-Skewer Box Kite!

Now, I had some trouble with the cross-pieces falling out while the kite flew in rough air. Hence you might like to glue the cross-pieces in place! The kite is a convenient size to put in the car, fully rigged, and won't take up much space in a shed.


Continue to page 3

Return to page 1




E-book special of the month (25% off)...


The
Sode is a traditional Japanese design, and this MBK version is exciting to watch in rough air!

If you have made Diamonds before, this kite takes a little more time to make. It's still a straight-forward build though, using the same techniques as used for my Dowel Diamond. 

Get the e-book for making the MBK Dowel Sode kite. The cambered sail makes this a very efficient design. Of the Dowel kites, this design is one of my personal favorites!

This Sode flies steep and steady over the Light wind range, and starts to move around quite a bit when the wind picks up to Moderate levels. Tail(s) are entirely optional, but may be added for looks.

The e-book is a PDF file - which means printable instructions to refer to while you make the kite. It also means convenient off-line access if that suits you better.



What's New!

  1. YOUR Kite Aerial Photography

    Dec 07, 16 09:00 AM

    This page features some KAP work by site visitors. From the 'just having a go' to the rather more professional!

    Read More





Comments

Plenty of fun kite info, photos and videos - there's definitely too much here for only one visit! Feel free to leave your impressions of this site or just this page, below...



Return to How To Make A Kite from How To Build A Box Kite

All the way back to Home Page


 


E-books


Kite-making e-book: Simplest Dowel Kites

This one's FREE
Download it now!



More E-books...





Testimonials
(unedited)

"Love the easy to understand step by step instructions, made from next to nothing materials and above all so much fun to fly... cheers Tim for sharing your well thought out pdf kite designs with the whole world.

Very satisfying making your own and watching them get air-born for the first time."

_________________

"I've just bought your super e-book and spent most of last night pouring through all the great stuff in it!

Very detailed and USEFUL information - thanks for such a great book."

_________________

"30+ years ago, I tried making a kite using the 'instructions' in a free kite-safety booklet. What a disappointment for a young boy.

 Your instructions and methods are wonderful. You help the builder to focus on accuracy, without making it hard. Also, you use materials that are durable, yet cheap!"

_________________

"omg i made a kite from this site and i fly it ....... booom i didnt expect this bc in the other sites instuction are trash

thank you"




Kite-making e-book: Simplest Dowel Kites

This one's FREE
Download it now!



More E-books...





Wind Speeds


Light air
1-5 km/h
1-3 mph
1-3 knots
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 km/h
4–7 mph
4–6 knots
Beaufort 2    

Gentle breeze
12–19 km/h
8–12 mph
7–10 knots
Beaufort 3    

Moderate breeze
20–28 km/h
13–18 mph
11–16 knots
Beaufort 4    

Fresh breeze
29–38 km/h
19–24 mph
17–21 knots
Beaufort 5    

Strong breeze
39–49 km/h
25–31 mph
22–27 knots
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 km/h
32-38 mph
28-33 knots
Beaufort 7